Violence occupies a large part of media coverage, policy discussions and academic research. Yet, despite the sometimes large-scale destruction they produce, armed conflicts are often the result of power struggles among fairly small numbers of players with interests very different from those of the general population. While their impact on people’s lives may be great, the legitimacy of their fight is often questionable.

By contrast, large-scale nonviolent movements inherently carry grievances supported by hundreds of thousands or millions of citizens. The political significance of these movements means that, whether we agree with their demands or not, they deserve to be heard and understood. The ‘Tracking Nonviolent Movements’ project aims to provide in-depth analysis of ongoing movements around the globe from a strategic standpoint to assess their strengths, weaknesses, likelihood of success and the obstacles they must overcome.

Because in all societies, even the most repressive ones, some form of civil society activism exists, BAM does not have the capacity to cover all nonviolent movements around the world. The ‘Tracking Nonviolent Movements’ project is thus restricted to those movements that have already achieved some critical mass of support and have gained significant visibility.

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo protesting over the disappeared in Argentina during the dictatorship

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo protesting over the disappeared in Argentina during the dictatorship