Brazil: Anti-corruption movement

Image Credit: Rovena Rosa/Flickr

Image Credit: Rovena Rosa/Flickr

In 2015, President Dilma Rousseff, along with former president and founder of ruling Worker’s Party (TP) Lula da Silva, came under investigation for their alleged involvement in a mass corruption scandal with state-owned oil giant Petrobras. Marches and rallies calling for her impeachment and for steps to tackle rampant corruption in the government have been continuous since the scandal became public.

The anti-corruption operation is known as Operacao Lava Jato (Operation Car Wash), which protesters have used as a banner to march under in addition to other slogans. Mass protests have also been help in support of TP and Rouseff's platform, with many of her supporters calling her impeachment process a 'judicial coup' and pointing to the corruption allegations against her successor at the presidency, Michel Termer.

At the same time, many have protested the massive amount of funds allocated to the constructing of stadiums for the 2016 Olympic Games instead of improving the country’s infrastructure or health and education systems. The International Olympic Committee (IOC), with the approval of Brazil’s government, first declared that peaceful protests were not allowed within or around the stadiums. This law was later revoked by Federal Judge João Araújo as it violated freedom of expression. 

 

Further Readings:

Rival movements duel over the future of Brazil. 2 September 2015. 
An in-depth article on the competing ideological forces protesting in Brazil. 

Brazilian president under fire as tens of thousands protest in 200 cities. The Guardian. 16 August 2015.
Coverage of the protests over corruption. 

How Brazil’s Olympic Dream Died. Politico. 13 August 2016. 
Background information on some of the issues that have caused people to protests recently. 

Brazilian Judge Rejects Using Law to Block Protests at Olympics. The Wall Street Journal. 9 August 2016. 
The ruling that upheld the right to protest at the Olympics.